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DESTINATION: Tigerair

By JOHN ROZENTALS

TRAVEL: 21 APRIL 2017

JOHN ROZENTALS finds plenty to like about flying with Tigerair.

I’m disappointed about how often Tigerair is dismissed as merely a discount airline.

Sure, it does engage in discounting but it’s certainly far from being alone there. Indeed, unless you’re forking out a wallet load of readies for a seat in the first few rows, you’re probably being treated as a discount passenger by Qantas.

I do prefer Tigerair’s term that it is a “low-cost” rather than a “discount” airline, and if that’s made possible by having to charge for things such as meals then so be it.

Tigerair recently withdrew its Bali services after several unfortunate battles with the Indonesian Government, and often seemed to be blamed for cancelled flights when the blame could just as squarely be laid with intransigent bureaucrats on the other side of the Timor Sea. Or is the Indian Ocean?

I’ve flown with Tigerair several times over the past couple of years, and, apart from the sometimes zealous policing of luggage regulations, have always found the experience and service to be friendly and more than adequate.

Our flights have mostly left and arrived on time, though statistics about on-time performance and cancelled flights remain confusing to say the least.

Hence, The Sydney Morning Herald has reported that: “Eighty five per cent of Tigerair’s domestic flights arrived on time last year, compared to 78 per cent of low-coast rival Jetstar’s.” This came at a time when the on-time average for all airlines was 86 per cent.

Others have been more dubious about Tigerair’s on-time delivery, though it seems undoubtedly true that its flight-cancellation rate is below the national average.

Food-wise, I’d certainly prefer to outlay a bit of money on good, solid tucker than put up with stuff that’s free but of dubious quality.

On early-morning flights, I’ve certainly enjoyed Tigerair’s bacon-and-egg combo, towards dinner the triple-beef-platter combo, and, in between, a simple plate of cheese and crackers.

And you can save a few bucks by pre-ordering online.

All in all, the choice seems worth making. Your chances of the flight being live and getting to its destination on time are about on average … and at least you know you’re bound for a city airport rather than one a packed-lunch away in the country.

My only real warning is to always take baggage restrictions seriously, regardless of which airline you’re flying.

With airlines under increasing pressure to keep weights down and save on fuel, the chances of it being checked and rejected are increasing all the time.

Visit tigerair.com.au.

*****

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One of Tigerair’s planes at Perth Airport.

Tigerair … service is friendly and more than adequate.

Tribe’s new Perth hotel … catering for tech-savvy design lovers and urban explorers.